How to brew the perfect cuppa

Tea isn't as simple as you think. There are so many different blends and types, and they all require different brewing times and temperatures! Here's our guide to making the perfect cuppa, including a bit about each type of tea, how to brew and what to add. Happy sipping!

Black Tea

About

Many of the active substances in black tea do not develop at temperatures lower than 90 °C. As a result, black tea in the West are usually steeped in water near boiling point, at around 99 °C. The most common fault when making black tea is to use water at too low a temperature. Black teas are usually brewed for four minutes and are shouldn’t be allowed to steep for less than 30 seconds or more than about five minutes.

Serving

All of our black teas can be served with or without milk, sweetened with sugar or honey, or served with lemon.

Brew Time

Weak: 3 mins  

Recommended: 4mins  

Strong: 5mins

 

Green Tea

About

Green tea is a type of tea that is made from camellia sinensis leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong and black tea. This results in more delicate leaves which can be easily damaged. Many people associate a bitter, unpleasant taste with green tea, this is caused by bruising the leaves. All of our teas are blended by hand to ensure they are carefully mixed and no damage occurs. This gives our green teas a bright, delicate and refreshingly sweet taste.

Serving

All of our green teas should be served without milk and with the leaves removed.

Brew Time

2 minutes at 80°C as any longer will burn the delicate leaves and give a bitter taste

 

Oolong Tea

About

The manufacturing of oolong tea is intricate because some of the basic steps involved in its making are repeated many times before the desired amount of bruising and browning of the leaves is achieved. Withering, rolling, shaping, and firing are similar to the black tea production process, but much more attention to timing and temperature is necessary. Although Oolong is often considered a black tea, it should be brewed more like a green tea.

Serving

Oolong tea can be served with or without milk and with the leaves removed.

Brew Time

3 minutes at 80°C as any longer will burn the delicate leaves and give a bitter taste

 

Rooibos

About

Rooibos is a herb native to South Africa that isn’t technically a “tea”. Rather, it’s a plant that when harvested and dried can be brewed into a reddish-brown herbal infusion dubbed “African red tea” or “red bush tea”. The more oxidised the rooibos, the redder in colour and sweeter and richer in flavour it becomes. Rooibos is a great caffeine free alternative for tea drinkers.

Serving

Rooibos can be served with or without milk sweetened with honey or sugar, or served with lemon.

Brew Time

4 minutes in boiling water

 

White Tea

About

White tea is generallly made up of the young or minimally processed leaves of the camellia sinesis plant. The name "white tea" actually comes from the silvery-white hairs on the unopened buds of the tea plant.

Serving

White tea should be served without milk, but you could try adding some sugar, honey or a slice of lemon to suit your personal taste. 

Brew Time

2 minutes at 80°C as any longer will burn the delicate leaves and give a bitter taste.

 

 

Fruit Infusions

About

Fruit infusions don't actually contain any tea, instead they are made up of fruit, fruit peels, herbs and flowers. This results in a juicy, sweet flavour that is delicious hot or iced. These teas are also great in cocktails and they are naturally caffeine free!

Serving

Fruit infusions should be served without milk. To make iced tea, boil the kettle and put the tea bags in a jug. Pour over 500ml boiling water and leave to steep for 5 mins. Meanwhile, put any fruit and sugar in a jug and lightly crush with the end of a rolling pin or a potato masher. Remove the tea bags from the water, pour the tea over the fruit and top up with another 300ml cold water. Add a large handful of ice to cool quickly, or chill until cold.

Brew Time

We recommend brewing these infusions in freshly boiled water for four minutes. Brew a little longer for a bolder flavour if desired.

 

 

Herbal Infusions

About

Not strictly tea, these drinks are distinguished from true teas as they are made up of flowers and herbs. In many countries, the word 'tea' may only be used for leaves of camellia sinensis and so these are called herbal infusions. These teas are soothing, natural and blends like peppermint and under the weather can help boost your immune system!

Serving

Herbal infusions should be served without milk. Add citrus fruits or honey if you wish!

Brew Time

We recommend brewing these infusions in freshly boiled water for four minutes. Brew a little longer for a bolder flavour if desired.

 

 

Health Blends

About

Unique to Cup, our range of herbal blends which have health boosting properties. Due to the herbal content of the health blends, they are not recommended for pregnant or nursing woman, or for those taking medication. Similar to herbal and fruit infusions, these blends use fruit, fruit peel, flowers and herbs to comfort, energise and give your immune system a kick.

Serving

Health blends should be served without milk. Add citrus fruits or honey if you wish!

Brew Time

We recommend brewing these infusions in freshly boiled water for four minutes. Brew a little longer for a bolder flavour if desired.

 

 

Hannah Houston